VO Coaches

Sound better at Voice Over Essentials

Add a comment

You need to be a member of Voiceover Universe to add comments!

Join Voiceover Universe

Comment by Bettye Zoller on November 26, 2010 at 1:49am
I teach two workshops at Brandeis University in Boston. April 16 Beginners or those who need better career start. April 17 more advanced vo talents, producers, agents. M. Kelly teaches recording studio info. Mic time, voice coaching, business info. Private consultations in Boston several days surrounding sem dates. JOIN US. And enroll on my site http://www.voicesvoices.com. Thank you Jill Goldman, Boston voice talent, my planner.
Comment by Rhonda Miles on October 16, 2010 at 5:07am
Hello, Everyone.
Im just getting starded, does anyone know of any VO Coaches,training classes, and or workshops
in the Denver,Thornton, Northglen or Westminister Colorado area?
I thank you so much, for your feed back.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 18, 2010 at 10:00pm
Here's a trick from Vanessa Marshall that is wonderful. After you prepare your mp3 audition file, take the time to slide it into iTunes. Play it, and as it does, click on the "item artwork icon" at the bottom left. Drag a jpeg of your logo or pic into the window. Then, go up and fill in some of the information windows next to your audition title. Make sure you get your name in under "artist," your agent/contact phone number under "comments," and even your name under “album artist.” Then, drag the file out to your desktop and send it out. Your audio file "remembers” the information. Vanessa says that casting people often times listen to auditions via iTunes and leave them in there, and when they come across it in the future, there's your information in front of them. Sweeeet. I’ll have another trick to share on how to put your pic or logo on your audition files as an icon later. PF
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 18, 2010 at 9:55pm

Comment by Ron Harris on August 17, 2010 at 6:14pm
Ahhhh! I see said the blind man! "Names are important." That makes a lot of sense to me. I've got to add that to my list of coach quals :-). You're absolutely right about the quality/price quotient and I try that in mind. I'm in workshops until the end of September and will more deliberately define exactly what is needed to bring my voice in line with my goals. Pat, you're a great coach! I'm going to take you up on the "critical areas of voice over excellence' so I'll be in touch. Thanks - you've been a great help.

Ron.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 17, 2010 at 4:37pm
Ron, it's all about what you need. A private coach is like a medical specialist. You go to them with a specific problem to fix. Bill H., Marc C. and Nancy all have areas of expertise. You need to access what kind of specific help you need. If you don't know, you should continue to go to a GP, which, following my simile, are workshops, classes and events until you have specific goals in mind. If you need to be assisted in what the critical areas of voice over excellence are, e-mail me a patfraley dot com so I can be helpful. As far as prices go for the various people, it's like in real life. Once in a while I find a good deal. Many times, I'm disappointed in the quality I get and the support serve is bad. When I pay too much, I can forget the amount if what I get lasts, and I have support. One other factor is your resume. When an agent or buyer looks at the training area of your resume, they have ONE thing in mind: Do I recognize any names? Names are important. PF
Comment by Ron Harris on August 17, 2010 at 4:22pm
Hi Pat,

I really do appreciate your feedback. Keep it comin'! As to Nancy, I didn't mean that she isn't a great coach/instructor. She's just a little pricy is all - worth it I'm sure. I'm on a mission to find a coach that I can truly invest in, and that will in turn, invest in me. Both Marc and Nancy are on my short list. Ms. Zoller was also kind enough to invite me to train with her too. I'm close to choosing - and if they'd have me, will begin with my new coach soon. Between now and then however, if you know of coaches I should look at before settling, please share! Thanks,

Ron.
Comment by Darla Middlebrook on August 17, 2010 at 12:35pm
Dear Pat,
I am going to try your iTunes suggestion. As soon as I can get my computer to talk to me. It's being stubborn, today.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 17, 2010 at 11:25am
Here's a trick from Vanessa Marshall that is wonderful. After you prepare your mp3 audition file, take the time to slide it into iTunes. Play it, and as it does, click on the "item artwork icon" at the bottom left. Drag a jpeg of your logo or pic into the window. Then, go up and fill in some of the information windows next to your audition title. Make sure you get your name in under "artist" and perhaps your agent/contact phone number under "comments." Then, drag the file out to your desktop and send it out. Your file "remembers” the information. Vanessa says that casting people often times listen to auditions via iTunes amd leave them in there, and when they stray across it in the future, there's your information in front of them. Sweeeet. Finally, for you teachers who offer podcasts, mp3's of instruction, consider having them mastered as an audiobook. That way, they have your graphic, information, slide automatically into the "Books" (audiobooks) folder in iTunes, and then right into iPods, have the “resume” feature, and are bookmarked for easy reference when playing. I'm doing this and it's so handy for students.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 17, 2010 at 10:43am
Dear Ron,

Forgive my lurking over you and Philip's shoulder, but I just looked at Nancy Wolfson's website. Combed through the pages. I didn't find one word where she expounded her own abilities. She did quote students, buyers and posted blogs about her. Huge difference. "Let your praises be on another man's lips, as strangers, not your own." Proverbs 27:2 Well, the quotes are not from strangers, but we all are strange. Nancy was my agent 15 years ago and I mentored her as during a time when she made the transition from agenting to teaching. I don't believe she learned one thing from me, but she say's she did. Since that time, she has become one of voice overs' most sought after private teachers. We are so different in approach. She has a distinct style and goes after a student's personal style like a heat-seeking missle. Marc Cashman is a wonderful teacher who teaches the value of realizing "the story. " Also Bill Holmes who is strong on the acting side and personal style. Each with a different approach.

I know you didn't ask, but If I were seeking out private instruction, I'd see which teacher is the best fit. For me, I would go to Nancy, as she is aware of trends, and commercial voice over is on the vanguard of culture and how a performer's personal style may or may not fit in. She is also VERY forthright, amusing, smells good, and wears fantastic shoes. PF
Comment by Ron Harris on August 17, 2010 at 8:39am
Thanks Philip,

but tell me more about the swift kick? What are your thoughts here? I looked at Nancy's pages and rates. She thinks a lot of herself for sure which I guess is a good start. Why Nancy? Potential - I've got a mountain of - motivation - no shortage there. Voice - I've got one, but its really raw! Need help!
Comment by Philip Banks on August 17, 2010 at 4:09am
Ron.

I met Marc in an elevator and he seemed a very nice man. Beyond that I can't comment. As Pat pointed out making reference to my "tall so I wrote to a basketball player" .......Silly but we live in a silly world. So you need to start somewhere and silly place is as good as anywhere. What is your dream? Go on, dare to dream and articulate it as fully as possible. You need include as much detail as possible, this is very important as it will challenge dillusional thinking and put flesh on the bones of where your potential lies.

Having read your thoughts so far and heard the audio on your page I believe you need to start with a swift kick somewhere, the person to deliver that kick, or probably several well aimed kicks is Nancy Wolfson. At this stage, seek out no other Coach.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 16, 2010 at 9:39pm
So pleased to be offering Voice Match Masters Event with guest teacher, renown Post Production Casting Director, Barbara Harris. Such a wonderful, encouraging teacher. Details at my website, patfraley dot com

Comment by Ron Harris on August 16, 2010 at 9:22pm
Hi Phillip, Darla, Pat,

Thank you for your feedback. You've given me much to consider. Ya gotta love this business! Its true that all coaches are not created equal! I've invested too much I think in the puppy mill and others who's interests were more focused on the invoice than on moi. I figure that all part of paying my dues. In any case, thank you for your thoughts on the matter. I do have a coach in mind that you might be able to help me with. I got a lead on a Mr. Marc Cashman. He's got a great website, what looks like good credentials. He's in LA and looks like the real deal (they all look like the real deal to me!!) Does anyone know him - heard of him - had any experience with him? He's a VU member too. Anyone? Thanks in advance.

Ron.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 16, 2010 at 12:12pm
Dear Philip,

You were indeed careful to write, "genuine experience or expertise in the areas in which they teach is essential." Not my experience as a student in my Salad Days. I was taught acting by a teacher who would make Steven Seagal look like Daniel Day Lewis. I was mentored by Ronald A. Feinberg, who was modest in his performance skills. Nancy Wolfson, one the the best private instructors in the Voice Over Arena is the "Poster Girl" for a perceptive, effective teacher with no performance training or background whatsoever. From what I understand, you too are untrained, yet excel at the craft.
Also, I live in a city where many performers followed an unrealistic dream. David Letterman wrote many letters as a high school boy to Steve Allen. At 17, living in the Midwest, Nancy Carwright became a "pen pal" with Daws Butler. Bob Bergan called Mel Blanc on the phone and did his impression of Porky Pig for him as a teenager. Having never done a cartoon show, I met a producer at Hanna Barbara on a beach in Tahiti, and forced him to promise to listen to my demo prior to coming to LA to seek my fortune. I'll bet there are several NBA players who can recount writing letters to Magic Johnson sharing they were tall and would like to be a professional basketball. Silly? Yes, be we live in a silly world here. As Billy West says, "We are called upon to people worlds with two, two inch strips of flesh. Fond Regards, Pat
Comment by Philip Banks on August 16, 2010 at 10:36am
Mr Fraley,
Semantics are very important and you'll note that I wrote Coaches as opposed to "all coaches". A pre-qualifier is equally as important so I was careful to write "genuine experience or expertise in the areas in which they teach is essential" as opposed to "they're all a bunch of nobodies.

A reputable teacher would be wise to avoid the aspiring millionaire voice in the same way that an aspiring or indeed experienced VO wishing to learn more needs to avoid the person who claims teaching experience as they will make wild claims in order to fill as many chargeable hours as possible.

I am mentor, coach, adviser, counsel, mother or father to no one but if I see someone about to fall over I'll try to prevent injury if at all possible.
Comment by Pat Fraley on August 15, 2010 at 12:43pm
First to My Dear Philip,
Your Scottish pen is dripping with a deep, peety cynicism. I would suggest that your perception of voice over instruction might be skewed by your vantage point from Portgordon. Perhaps your opinion is based on the voice over advertising you see coming to by way of cyber newsletters, blog postings, and comments. I don’t know. The majority of voice over instructors that I know in North American are not driven by the desire to "fill as many chargeable hours as possible," but earnest in their efforts to guide voice over performers toward acquiring the skills necessary to advance their efforts and skills. I am in daily contact with teaching colleagues, and we lean on each other to find wisdom for advancing the craft. Yes, some teachers have modest skills, and we have our charlatans. All businesses have them.
To Ron,
Having a DEEP voice is a blessing. It is also a limitation. True style comes from flaunting your limitations. My friend and performer, Brad Garrett, has a uniquely deep voice, and has managed to build the voice over side of his career by taking the time to acquire a formidable set of skills and the knowledge as to where it his pipes are sought after, and where they are not.
To Darla,
So good to hear that your coach is guiding you into genres of voice over you perceived unattractive, and you are finding them agreeable. Also, your coach is so bang on in teaching you the skills at finding and realizing “the story” in commercials. Inside all commercials is a “miserable little story” we are called upon to illuminate.
Comment by Darla Middlebrook on August 15, 2010 at 9:27am
A response to Ron & Phillip: I am just starting out in VO. My voice is deep and resonant for a female. I had decided that I was going to concentrate only on honing my skills for narration and audio books because I do not enjoy commercial work. My coach has been helping me with that, but at the same time encouraging me to improve my skills in the areas that I thought I disliked. I am finding that, if I view the commercials as just another way of telling the story, I can enjoy commercials after all. The point is that, as an artist just starting out, I was limiting myself. Thinking and moving out of my "box" has helped me to improve in the areas that I love (narration and audio books). Don't limit yourself, Ron.
Comment by Philip Banks on August 15, 2010 at 4:49am
Just a quick response to Ron. Depth of your voice is not really as important as you think. "Dear Magic, I like you am tall so I really want to play pro basket ball". In that context it just sounds rather silly, doesn't it? Regardless of what the Coaches and Voice Masters want to tell you or more likely SELL you, it is probably not up to you what you do as a VO, the market will decide. Does the sex of your Coach matter? No but genuine experience or expertise in the areas in which they teach is essential. We have in this business a collision of desires. VO desires to be the next million dollar voice and the Coach desires to fill as many chargeable hours as possible.

Coaches and VOs are both in the business of communicating and both waste an awful lot of time failing in their businesses. What needs to change in the majority of cases?

"As a VO I am too busy trying to be a VOICE to communicate and my Coach is too busy distracting me with VO smoke and mirrors to teach me to communicate" Repeat every day until you decide to implement a policy of change.
Comment by Ron Harris on August 14, 2010 at 4:59pm
Ron Harris here. I've got a couple of questions that are just gnawing at me so I thought I'd ask the pros. Ok, here it goes - first, I've got a really deep voice and as such, it just doesn't suit a lot of venues. I've been thinking trailers, promos, tags and possibly documentary, but I'm told by my coach that I need to make a narration and commercial reel in order to begin in the business. Fair enough, however, shouldn't I be training in the area of VO that I intend to pursue? Granted, some basic skills can be learned from whatever area I train in, yet I can't help but think that each area of VO is sufficently specialized, that time (and money) is best spent in the area I intend to work. Can someone help?

Second question. As I mentioned above, I've got a really deep voice. Does it matter whether my instructor is male or female?

© 2018   Created by VU - Founder - Zurek.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service